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Travel nurse credentialing – 5 things to know

by Lindsay Wilcox

You’ve landed your dream travel nursing job, so most of the hard work is done. However, the travel nurse credentialing process comes next — and you might have a few questions about what to expect.

Fortunately, RNnetwork’s credentialing team is eager to help and make it simple for you to start your new position. Here are five things nurses should know about credentialing for a travel nursing job.

1. Complete the prescreening step

Even before the team begins calling references, you will answer some questions about your background and nursing experience.

Background checks are routine and usually come through without any problems. If you do have any irregularities in your history, don’t assume that you’re immediately disqualified. If you have been convicted of a misdemeanor or felony, it’s important to be honest about it and tell your recruiter and the credentialing team. They will review your history and decide whether an open case or other behavior would prevent you from taking the job. They will also consider whether you would be a good fit for the hospital where you plan to work.

Once you have been approved for an assignment, the credentialing team can get court documents to clear you for work.

2. Document your work history

The next step in the credentialing process is getting a little fact-checking done. Your recruiter will help you make sure that:

  • your skill set is up to date
  • you have core nursing competencies
  • your work history and references are complete valid

You will take skills-based tests to determine your competency in everything from pharmacology to labor and delivery (if you’re working in that field).

travel nurse credentialing - image of work history documentation

3. Get up to speed with expert exam prep

If it’s been a while since you’ve been in an exam room, don’t worry.

“Some of our nurses have been working for 14 years and aren’t used to taking tests,” says Bill Cornhoff, director of operations at RNnetwork. “The tests are about theory (think NCLEX versus practical application). We help get our nurses in test-taking mode and help them develop critical-thinking skills.”

If you don’t pass a test on the first go-around, you’ll be glad to know that RNnetwork has two clinical nurse managers who can help you regroup and get ready to pass the next time.

“Our nurse managers will have phone calls or video calls with nurses to walk them through practice exams,” Bill says. “They offer test-taking tips and review best practices if the nurse knows they failed a certain area of the test. We spend anywhere from 5 to 90 minutes helping the nurses, depending on what they need.”

4. Make sure you’re healthy enough for work

The final step in the credentialing process is getting health documents from each nurse, or proof of immunizations, to make sure they’re ready for a 13-week assignment.

If you’re not up-to-date on your immunizations, RNnetwork will help you find a place to get your shots and may even cover part of the cost.

5. Choose an agency that will go the extra mile

RNnetwork wants its travel nurses to take their assignments and remain on assignment — and they are committed to providing extra service to help solve any problems you may encounter.

“We offer a concierge service beyond our competitors,” Bill says. “We’re really focused on our people. We have single parents who hire a babysitter so they can help a nurse until 8 p.m. One of our clinical nurse managers has even coached nurses through tests at home when they need help. We are committed to putting in that extra effort.”

 

About Lindsay Wilcox

Lindsay Wilcox is a healthcare writer and editor with more than 10 years of professional writing experience. When she's not circling typos, she's enjoying fish tacos and hanging out with her family.

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